Lyrics

All For Me Grog

Fo’c’sle Song

Traditional

Chorus
And it’s all for me grog, me jolly’, jolly’ grog
Resp: All gone for beer and tobacco
For I spent all me tin with the lassies drinking gin
Resp: Far across the Western Ocean I must wander

Gina:
[Oh] where are me boots, me noggin’, noggin’ boots?
Resp: All gone for beer and tobacco
For the heels they are worn out and the toes are kicked about
And the soles are looking out for better weather (Chorus)

Dean:
Where is me shirt, my noggin’, noggin’ shirt?
Resp: All gone for beer and tobacco
For the collar is all worn, and the sleeves they are all torn
And the tail is looking out for better weather (Chorus)

David:
Where is me bed, me noggin’ noggin bed
Resp: All gone for beer and tobacco
Now the sheets they are all tore, cause I lent it to a whore,
And the springs are looking out for better weather.

New Chorus
Well it’s all for me grog, me jolly jolly grog
Resp: All gone for beer and tobacco
Well, I spent all me loot in a house of ill repute
And I think I’ll have to go back there tomorrow.

Jon with Christie:
Where is my verse, me jolly, jolly verse
Resp: All gone for beer and tobacco
Well the nouns they are all gone and the adjectives, “So Long!”
And the verbs are lookin’ out for better weather (New Chorus)

And I think I’ll have to go back there tomorrow.
Yes, I think I’ll have to go back there tomorrow!

WHERE TO FIND IT

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Song Notes

Rum distillation began in the Caribbean in the early 17th century. When Britain captured Jamaica in 1655 the navy switched its sailor’s daily ration of French brandy to rum. Around 1740 British Admiral Edward Vernon commanded that the rum ration be watered down with water to prevent the sailors from hoarding until they had sufficient quantity to become inebriated with. This thinned-out drink was nicknamed Grog, perhaps apocryphally after the grogram cloak Vernon preferred to wear. Through the pubs that sailors frequented when back in port this song has achieved wide notoriety and is sung in many folk and entertainment genres.

Jeff Gee, who played “Fiddler Davey” in Bristol Renaissance Faire’s ensemble cast appearance as The Seadogs, first brought this tune to our circle. It is actually the first maritime music tune I’d ever sung! Bounding Main proudly brings this song to audiences today – in its own inimitable style.

The use of the term “Western Ocean” was a common way of referring to the Atlantic Ocean.

– Dean Calin